Noetics

I’ve mentioned before that one of the things I like about my Crime and Coffee book club is that I read books I probably wouldn’t bother with otherwise.

Sometimes, when I cannot generate any kind of interest, or the book just doesn’t grip me I will read it in reverse (Last chapter first etc). I like to challenge myself.

This month’s book is interesting and I am enjoying it.

Colson Whitehead’s book is quite enjoyable.

But my attention does wander (which probably explains reading 2 or 3 books at the same time).

So when I was at Cafe O the other day, where books free for the taking line every window sill, I spied Dan Brown’s The Lost Symbol. I had read it years ago, but felt the urge to give it another go.

Brown weaves a good tale sprinkled with just enough reality to grip one’s imagination. This time I decided to search out more information about some of the ‘real’ things, one of which is IONS – the Institute of Noetic Sciences.

Never heard of them. So I have spent a lot of my time today learning about this organization. And I am enjoying learning. Intrigued might be a better word. I may have mentioned at sometime that my SIL and I had a discussion and came to the conclusion that she is firm in her beliefs and I am open-minded. And that we are each quite happy as we are.

Below is information from Wiki on the subject.

The Institute of Noetic Sciences (founded in 1973) describes noetic sciences as “how beliefs, thoughts, and intentions affect the physical world”. Since the 1970s and the foundation of the Institute of Noetic Sciences by NASA astronaut Edgar Mitchell and others, the term “noetics” has been adopted by several authors such as Christian de Quincey in Deep Spirit: Cracking the Noetic Code (2008) and Dan Brown in The Lost Symbol (2009), who write about consciousness and spirituality.

Metaphysics is the branch of philosophy that studies the fundamental nature of reality, the first principles of being, identity and change, space and time, causality, necessity, and possibility.[1] It includes questions about the nature of consciousness and the relationship between mind and matter, between substance and attribute, and between potentiality and actuality.[2] The word “metaphysics” comes from two Greek words that, together, literally mean “after or behind or among [the study of] the natural”. It has been suggested that the term might have been coined by a first century CE editor who assembled various small selections of Aristotle‘s works into the treatise we now know by the name Metaphysics (μετὰ τὰ φυσικά, meta ta physika, lit. ‘after the Physics ’, another of Aristotle’s works).[3]

Topics of metaphysical investigation include existenceobjects and their propertiesspace and timecause and effect, and possibility. Metaphysics is considered one of the four main branches of philosophy, along with epistemologylogic, and ethics.[5]

So from North of 43, I quote Shakespeare There are more things in heaven and earth, Horacio,/ That are dreamt of in your philosophy’

Chris G September 16th ‘22
Advertisement