Highway of Tears & Wind River

I am not always crazy about my book club’s (Coffee and Crime) choices of books, but I always willing embrace the choice because I always learn something new. It broadens my horizons.

This month is one of those choices I wouldn’t choose. But. It is heartbreaking. Almost too real for my liking. I often say I like my reading to be pure fiction.

Reality is not always a nice place to be.

Rather than a who-done-it novel this month, the book is Highway of Tears

Still murder. But heartbreaking.

It brought to mind a movie I saw a few years ago, that didn’t get a lot of press at the time.
It should have gotten huge press. Just for the truth alone.

Wind River starred Jeremy Renner and Elizabeth Olsen, both of whom did an outstanding job.

Highway of Tears is an actual highway. A 725 km (450 mile corridor between Prince George and Prince Rupert, British Columbia in Canada. This has been the location of many missing and murdered Indigenous women beginning in 1970

But death of our Indigenous women is not restricted to this highway.

The stories are there. The truth is there. The crimes continue. And there seems to be no justice. Fiction has justice. Is justice fiction? I ask myself that.

Where? How?

So deep questions from North of 43 and more than a bit of shame.

Chris G August 15th ‘22

Published by

CG

One is about 43 degrees latitude N. and longitude 80 W, The other almost equidistant south latitude and longitude 174 E. Two women, two minds, different personalities and experiences, choosing a life of meaning, continual growth and learning, at the same time negating ageist opinions of exactly what ‘an old lady’ should be.

4 thoughts on “Highway of Tears & Wind River”

  1. Is fiction justice or is justice fiction? I do wish the movie were still available.
    Your story resounds with the awful facts from Australia -“Aboriginal women are 11 times more likely to die from family violence than non-Aboriginal women. They are more likely to experience sexual violence, hospitalisation and significant health impacts from intimate partner violence. women are 11 times more likely to die from family violence than non-Aboriginal women. They are more likely to experience sexual violence, hospitalisation and significant health impacts from intimate partner violence.”

    Liked by 1 person

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